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Rights Respecting Schools

World Book Day was created by UNESCO on 23rd April 1995 as a worldwide celebration of books and reading.

It is marked in over 100 countries around the globe. The first World Book Day in the UK and Ireland took place in 1997 to encourage young people to discover the pleasure of reading.

World Book Day is also now a charity with a mission to help change children’s lives by promoting reading for pleasure, offering every child and young person the opportunity to have a book of their own. 

This year (2021) marks the 24th year of WBD on 4th March and we hope you can find many different ways to enjoy reading.

There are lots of connections between World Book Day and your rights, especially your rights to access reliable information, the right to develop your talents and abilities and the right to relax and play. 

‘For Every Child’ by UNICEF 3.2.21

Today’s class story is called ‘For Every Child’ by UNICEF and it is a very important book. This book teaches you all about your rights as a child. We’ve been doing work on this in Rights Respecting Schools and Votes for Schools

For Every Child by UNICEF

Article of the week: 1.2.21

LGBT+ History Month focuses on the celebration and recognition of LGBT+ people and culture; past and present to give people scope to talk about the bigger picture of LGBT+ experience, in which LGBT+ people are the agents of change.

The month celebrates successes and people and also recognises the challenges still faced today. The month also helps people outside of the LGBT+ community learn more about LGBT+ people, culture and history.

A piece of work based on the Right of the Fortnight

Article of the Week

19.1.21

 

Each week there is an article, which gives us a focus for the week of learning. This week it is 24 and 28. 

 

Article 24 – Health care ensures that every child has the right to the best possible health

 

Article 28 - Every child has the right to an education

 

What is a Rights Respecting School? 19.1.21

 

"A Rights Respecting School is a place where we can all feel confident with ourselves and it encourages us to use our voice. It has helped me build my confidence. It has helped me raise awareness of injustice in the world"

 

There are four key areas of impact for children at a Rights Respecting school; wellbeing, participation, relationships and self-esteem

 

Children are healthier and happier: “We all know our rights and know that if our rights aren’t respected we can do something.”

 

Children feel safe: "Since becoming rights respecting our children feel happier, safe and confident and are ready to learn"

 

Children have better relationships: “Our views are taken very seriously. Our opinion matters because we are the pupils, we know what it is like in the school and their (adults) perspective is different from ours.” 

 

Children become active and involved in school life and the wider world: “It’s made me very aware of my surroundings. We do loads of things that make everyone else aware too, like sending red hands [letters] to Members of Parliament.”

 

"Rights are the context for all our work – they provide a framework for the whole jigsaw."

 

 

 

 

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